Diana Mosley: Mitford Beauty, British Fascist, Hitler’s Angel

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Harper Perennial #ad - They became close friends and he attended her wedding as the guest of honor. It is a riveting tell-all memoir of a leading society hostess, a woman with intimate access to the highest literary, political, and social circles of her time. During the war, the mosleys' association with Hitler led them to be arrested and interned for three and a half years.

Diana's relationships with hitler and Mosley defined her life in the public eye and marked her as a woman who possessed a singular lack of empathy for those less blessed at birth. Anne de courcy's revealing biography chronicles one of the most intriguing, controversial women of the twentieth century. Written with mosley's exclusive cooperation and based upon hundreds of hours of taped interviews and unprecedented access to her private papers, and diaries, letters, Lady Mosley's only stipulation was that the book not be published until after her death.

Diana Mosley: Mitford Beauty, British Fascist, Hitler's Angel #ad - Diana mosley was a society beauty who fell from grace when she left her husband, brewery heir Bryan Guinness, for Sir Oswald Mosley, an admirer of Mussolini and a notorious womanizer. This horrified her family and scandalized society. In 1933, diana met the new German leader, Adolf Hitler.

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The Viceroy's Daughters: The Lives of the Curzon Sisters

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Harper Perennial #ad - Based on unpublished letters and diaries, The Viceroy's Daughters is a riveting portrait of three spirited and wilful women who were born at the height of British upper-class wealth and privilege. The oldest, alcohol, Irene, never married but pursued her passion for foxes, and married men. And we discover a world of women, impeccably bred and unabashedly wilful, whose passion and spirit were endlessly fascinating.

The Viceroy's Daughters: The Lives of the Curzon Sisters #ad - And baba, the youngest and most beautiful, possessed an appetite for adultery that was as dangerous as it was outrageous. As the sisters dance, and romance their way through England's most hallowed halls, dine, we get an intimate look at a country clinging to its history in the midst of war and rapid change.

. We obtain fresh perspectives on such personalities as the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Nancy Astor and the Cliveden Set, Oswald Mosley, and Lord Halifax. The middle, cimmie, was a Labour Party activist turned Fascist.

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A Life of Contrasts: The Autobiography

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Gibson Square #ad - Beautifully written. Valerie grove, The Times 'Martini-dry wit. Irish times 'Often pure Wodehouse. Financial Times 'Uncompromising. A. N. Wilson, sunday Telegraph 'It has all her charm. Laura thompson, a good Read, BBC Radio 4 'Brilliant. Evening standard 'a life of contrasts is a candid, page-turning memoir, written by a woman who will—without any doubt—be viewed by history as one of the most fascinating personalities of the Twentieth Century.

Mary S. Diana mitford describes in the inimitable mitford way how it came about that both Winston Churchill and Adolf Hitler adored her, and Evelyn Waugh and Oswald Mosley fell in love with her. Lovell 'lady mosley writes extremely well… Her book reads like brilliant talk; her characters live and die in a single phrase… An autobiography of real distinction.

A Life of Contrasts: The Autobiography #ad - Jonathan raban, sunday times 'i envy any reader coming for the first time to A Life of Contrasts, Diana Mosley's account of her own eventful past, for he has a rare treat in front of him. Selina hastings 'sharp, new statesman 'wholly if grittily, amusing and well-written' Hugh Thomas, a Mitford book… the reader will be flung between delight and dismay as he reads on… To all those not averse to a little powdered glass in their Bombe Surprise: enjoy.

The times 'other members of the Mitford family do not have the monopoly of brilliant and amusing writing. The tatler 'she emerges among all else as feminine…' Mary Warnock, The Listener 'Animated and revealing. Hibernia 'Witty and amusing.

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The Sisters: The Saga of the Mitford Family

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - In this wise, mary lovell captures the vitality and drama of a family that took the twentieth century by storm and became, and generous book, evenhanded, in some respects, its victims. Jessica was a communist; debo became the duchess of devonshire; nancy was one of the best-selling novelists of her day; beautiful Diana married the Fascist leader Sir Oswald Mosley; and Unity, a close friend of Hitler, shot herself in the head when England and Germany declared war.

The mitfords had style and presence and were mercilessly gifted. Above all, they were funny—hilariously and mercilessly so. Fascinating, the way all great family stories are fascinating. Robert gottlieb, new york times book ReviewThis is the story of a close, loving family splintered by the violent ideologies of Europe between the world wars.

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The Mitfords: Letters between Six Sisters

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Fourth Estate #ad - Carefree, revelatory and intimate, this selection of unpublished letters between the six legendary Mitford sisters, compiled by Diana Mitford’s daughter-in-law, is alive with wit, passion and heartbreak. The letters chronicle the social quirks and political upheavals of the twentieth century but also chart the stormy, enduring relationships between the uniquely gifted – and collectively notorious – Mitford sisters.

There’s nancy, the scalding wit and bestselling novelist; pamela, the runaway communist; and Deborah, who craved a quiet country life; Diana, the fascist wife of Sir Oswald Mosley; Unity, whose obsession with Adolf Hitler led to personal tragedy; Jessica, the socialite who became Duchess of Devonshire.

The Mitfords: Letters between Six Sisters #ad - Writing to one another to confide, tease, rage and gossip, above all, the Mitford sisters set out, to amuse. A correspondence of this scope is rare; a collection penned by six born storytellers is irreplaceable.

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The Six: The Lives of the Mitford Sisters

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St. Martin's Press #ad - The six captures all the wayward magnetism and levity that have enchanted countless writers without neglecting the tragic darkness of many of the sisters’ life choices and the savage sociopolitical currents that fueled them. Tina brown, the new york times book review the eldest was a razor-sharp novelist of upper-class manners; the second was loved by John Betjeman; the third was a fascist who married Oswald Mosley; the fourth idolized Hitler and shot herself in the head when Britain declared war on Germany; the fifth was a member of the American Communist Party; the sixth became Duchess of Devonshire.

They were the mitford sisters: Nancy, Jessica, Diana, Pamela, Unity, and Deborah. Born into country-house privilege in the early years of the 20th century, they became prominent as “bright young things” in the high society of interwar London. An instant new york times bestseller“riveting. The six was previously published as Take Six Girls.

The Six: The Lives of the Mitford Sisters #ad - . Then, as the shadows crept over 1930s Europe, the stark—and very public—differences in their outlooks came to symbolize the political polarities of a dangerous decade. The intertwined stories of their stylish and scandalous lives—recounted in masterly fashion by Laura Thompson—hold up a revelatory mirror to upper-class English life before and after WWII.

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The Duchess of Windsor: A Memoir

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Gibson Square #ad - What was it about her that utterly captivated the heir to the throne and made him renounce it when he became King? It is this question which Diana Mosley seeks to answer and which she is perhaps better qualified to answer than anyone else, given her marriage to Sir Oswald Mosley, Leader of the British Fascists.

An intimate of the duke and duchess of windsor, Diana Mosley was a frequent guest at their parties in Paris, or at 'the Moulin' in Orsay, where they were neighbours. Written in her inimitable style Diana Mosley paints a remarkable portrait of her friend that is also realistic with regards to her flaws.

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Mrs Guinness: The Rise and Fall of Diana Mitford, the Thirties Socialite

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The History Press #ad - She was a muse to many: helleu painted her, James Lees-Milne worshipped her, Evelyn Waugh dedicated a book to her and Winston Churchill nicknamed her 'Dina-mite'. As the young wife of bryan guinness, heir to the Guinness brewing empire, she lived a gilded life until fascist leader Sir Oswald Mosley turned her head.

Unpublished letters, diaries and archives bring an unknown Diana to life, creating a portrait of a beautiful woman whose charm and personality enthralled all who met her, but the discourse of her life would ultimately act as a cautionary tale. This groundbreaking biography reveals the woman behind the myth.

Mrs Guinness: The Rise and Fall of Diana Mitford, the Thirties Socialite #ad - . Before diana mitford's disgrace as a social pariah, she was a celebrated member of the Bright Young Things, moving at the centre of 1920s and '30s London high society.

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