Power in Numbers

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Race Point Publishing #ad - Power in Numbers #ad - See their stories! Power in numbers: the rebel women of mathematics is a full-color volume that takes aim at the forgotten influence of women on the development of mathematics over the last two millennia. You'll see each eminent mathematician come to life on each page, women like the astronomer-philosopher Hypatia, theoretical physicist Emmy Noether, and rocket scientist Annie Easley.

Power in numbers: the rebel women of Mathematics is an affirmation of female genius and a celebration of the boundless applications of mathematics. Prepare to be inspired.

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Inventing the Mathematician: Gender, Race, and Our Cultural Understanding of Mathematics

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SUNY Press #ad - Hottinger is professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at Keene State College. Considers how our ideas about mathematics shape our individual and cultural relationship to the field. Where and how do we, as a culture, get our ideas about mathematics and about who can engage with mathematical knowledge? Sara N.

Hottinger examines how these discourses shape mathematical subjectivity by limiting the way some groups—including women and people of color—are able to see themselves as practitioners of math. She considers four locations in which representations of mathematics contribute to our cultural understanding of mathematics: mathematics textbooks, portraits of mathematicians, the history of mathematics, and the field of ethnomathematics.

Inventing the Mathematician: Gender, Race, and Our Cultural Understanding of Mathematics #ad - . Inventing the mathematician provides a blueprint for how to engage in a deconstructive project, revealing the limited and problematic nature of the normative construction of mathematical subjectivity. Sara N. Hottinger uses a cultural studies approach to address how our ideas about mathematics shape our individual and cultural relationship to the field.

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Nothing Stopped Sophie: The Story of Unshakable Mathematician Sophie Germain

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Little, Brown Books for Young Readers #ad - When a professor discovered that the homework sent to him under a male pen name came from a woman. Nothing stopped Sophie. And when she tackled a math problem that male scholars said would be impossible to solve. Still, nothing stopped Sophie. For six years sophie germain used her love of math and her undeniable determination to test equations that would predict patterns of vibrations.

Nothing Stopped Sophie: The Story of Unshakable Mathematician Sophie Germain #ad - The true story of eighteenth-century mathematician Sophie Germain, who solved the unsolvable to achieve her dream. When her parents took away her candles to keep their young daughter from studying math. Nothing stopped Sophie. She eventually became the first woman to win a grand prize from France's prestigious Academy of Sciences for her formula, which laid the groundwork for much of modern architecture and can be seen in the book's illustrations.

Award-winning author cheryl bardoe's inspiring and poetic text is brought to life by acclaimed artist Barbara McClintock's intricate pen-and-ink, watercolor, and collage illustrations in this true story about a woman who let nothing stop her.

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Women in Mathematics The MIT Press

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The MIT Press #ad - The obstacles and censures that were also a part of their lives are a sobering reminder of the bias against women still present in this and other fields of academic endeavor. Mathematicians, science historians, and general readers will find this book a lively history; women will find it a reminder of a proud tradition and a challenge to take their rightful place in academic life today.

Women in Mathematics The MIT Press #ad - The colorful lives of these women, who often traveled in the most avant-garde circles of their day, are presented in fascinating detail. Mathematicians, science historians, and general readers will find this book a lively history; women will find it a reminder of a proud tradition and a challenge to take their rightful place in academic life today.

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Math Recess: Playful Learning in an Age of Disruption

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Impress #ad - Brownell are bold. The tinkerers. Here’s to the humanity of friendships that lead to mathematical love. Let’s play math!”in the theme of recess, ropes, and toys would be kept for children to play with, this book holds a deep and imaginative collection of fun mathematical ideas, where a treasure chest of balls, puzzles, and problems.

The fantasizers. With clarity, power, and exuberance, Chris and Sunil spell out and make concrete what it means to play. James tanton, phd, founder of the Global Math Project“Here’s to the dabblers. Go, be bold with them. All are welcome. Mary kemper, president of the texas association of supervisors of Mathematics“Through rich storytelling and powerful examples, Singh and Brownell make the clear case for upending math education as we know it and replacing it with an ideology we can all embrace: Mathematics is and can be deeply learned through play.

Math Recess: Playful Learning in an Age of Disruption #ad - Denis sheeran, author, instant Relevance and Hacking Math“Disruption begins with ‘Re. Rather than trying to fix a broken system, it is time to reimagine a new one, and Math Recess completely satisfies my appetite for destruction. Brian aspinall, educator, author of Code Breaker and Block Breaker. The curious ones who believe math education can and should be about play.

Sunil singh and Christopher S.

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How to Bake Pi: An Edible Exploration of the Mathematics of Mathematics

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Basic Books #ad - So, what is math? Let's look for the answer in the kitchen. One of the world's most creative mathematicians finds the meaning of mathematics in the kitchen in this "whimsical. Rigorous and insightful" new york times bookwhat is math? how exactly does it work? And what do three siblings trying to share a cake have to do with it? In How to Bake Pi, math professor Eugenia Cheng provides an accessible introduction to the logic and beauty of mathematics, powered, unexpectedly, by insights from the kitchen.

How to Bake Pi: An Edible Exploration of the Mathematics of Mathematics #ad - We learn how the bechamel in a lasagna can be a lot like the number five, and why making a good custard proves that math is easy but life is hard. At the heart of it all is cheng's work on category theory, a cutting-edge "mathematics of mathematics, " that is about figuring out how math works. Combined with her infectious enthusiasm for cooking and true zest for life, Cheng's perspective on math is a funny journey through a vast territory no popular book on math has explored before.

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The Crest of the Peacock: Non-European Roots of Mathematics - Third Edition

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Princeton University Press #ad - The book's scope is now even wider, india, incorporating recent findings on the history of mathematics in China, and early Islamic civilizations as well as Egypt and Mesopotamia. From the ishango bone of central africa and the inca quipu of South America to the dawn of modern mathematics, The Crest of the Peacock makes it clear that human beings everywhere have been capable of advanced and innovative mathematical thinking.

The third edition emphasizes the dialogue between civilizations, and further explores how mathematical ideas were transmitted from East to West. George gheverghese joseph takes us on a breathtaking multicultural tour of the roots and shoots of non-European mathematics. With more detailed coverage of proto-mathematics and the origins of trigonometry and infinity in the East, The Crest of the Peacock further illuminates the global history of mathematics.

The Crest of the Peacock: Non-European Roots of Mathematics - Third Edition #ad - He shows us the deep influence that the egyptians and Babylonians had on the Greeks, the Arabs' major creative contributions, and the astounding range of successes of the great civilizations of India and China.

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Mind and Matter: A Life in Math and Football

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Penguin Press #ad - Equally at home discussing georg cantor’s work on infinities and bill belichick’s playbook, Urschel reveals how each challenge—whether on the field or in the classroom—has brought him closer to understanding the two different halves of his own life, and how reason and emotion, the mind and the body, are always working together.

Wave and particle. A new york times bestsellerjohn urschel, tells the story of a life balanced between two passionsFor John Urschel, mathematician and former offensive lineman for the Baltimore Ravens, what began as an insatiable appetite for puzzles as a child developed into mastery of the elegant systems and rules of mathematics.

Mind and Matter: A Life in Math and Football #ad - Athlete and mathematician. By the time he was thirteen, Urschel was auditing a college-level calculus course. He describes his parents’ different influences and their profound effect on him, and he opens up about the correlation between football and CTE and the risks he took for the game he loves. While he was an offensive lineman for the Baltimore Ravens, he simultaneously pursued his PhD in mathematics at MIT.

As a nittany lion, he refused to sacrifice one passion for the other. Football challenged urschel in an entirely different way, and he became addicted to the physical contact of the sport. So often, people want to divide the world into two, ” he observes. Against the odds, urschel found a way to manage his double life as a scholar and an athlete.

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Change Is the Only Constant: The Wisdom of Calculus in a Madcap World

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Black Dog & Leventhal #ad - Change is the only constant is an engaging and eloquent exploration of the intersection between calculus and daily life, complete with Orlin's sly humor and memorably bad drawings. Divided into two parts, literature, "moments" and "eternities, art, Change is the Only Constant unearths connections between calculus, " and drawing on everyone from Sherlock Holmes to Mark Twain to David Foster Wallace, and a beloved dog named Elvis.

Change Is the Only Constant: The Wisdom of Calculus in a Madcap World #ad - By spinning 28 engaging mathematical tales, orlin shows us that calculus is simply another language to express the very things we humans grapple with every day -- love, risk, and most importantly, time, change. The next book from ben orlin, the popular math blogger and author of the underground bestseller Math With Bad Drawings.

Change is the only constant is an engaging and eloquent exploration of the intersection between calculus and daily life, complete with Orlin's sly humor and wonderfully bad drawings. This is not just math for math's sake; it's math for the sake of becoming a wiser and more thoughtful human.

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Math with Bad Drawings: Illuminating the Ideas That Shape Our Reality

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Black Dog & Leventhal #ad - In math with bad drawings, ben orlin reveals to us what math actually is; its myriad uses, its strange symbols, and the wild leaps of logic and faith that define the usually impenetrable work of the mathematician. Every discussion in the book is illustrated with Orlin's trademark "bad drawings, " which convey his message and insights with perfect pitch and clarity.

With 24 chapters covering topics from the electoral college to human genetics to the reasons not to trust statistics, Math with Bad Drawings is a life-changing book for the math-estranged and math-enamored alike. Orlin shows us how to think like a mathematician by teaching us a brand-new game of tic-tac-toe, how to understand an economic crises by rolling a pair of dice, and the mathematical headache that ensues when attempting to build a spherical Death Star.

Math with Bad Drawings: Illuminating the Ideas That Shape Our Reality #ad - A hilarious reeducation in mathematics-full of joy, jokes, and stick figures-that sheds light on the countless practical and wonderful ways that math structures and shapes our world. Truth and knowledge come in multiple forms: colorful drawings, encouraging jokes, and the stories and insights of an empathetic teacher who believes that math should belong to everyone.

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Infinite Powers: How Calculus Reveals the Secrets of the Universe

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt #ad - An array of witty and astonishing stories. Strogatz reveals how this form of math rose to the challenges of each age: how to determine the area of a circle with only sand and a stick; how to explain why Mars goes “backwards” sometimes; how to make electricity with magnets; how to ensure your rocket doesn’t miss the moon; how to turn the tide in the fight against AIDS.

As strogatz proves, calculus is truly the language of the universe. To illuminate how calculus has helped bring into being our contemporary world. The washington postfrom preeminent math personality and author of The Joy of x, a brilliant and endlessly appealing explanation of calculus – how it works and why it makes our lives immeasurably better.

Without calculus, tv, gpS, we wouldn’t have cell phones, or ultrasound. We wouldn’t have unraveled dna or discovered Neptune or figured out how to put 5, 000 songs in your pocket. Though many of us were scared away from this essential, engrossing subject in high school and college, Steven Strogatz’s brilliantly creative, down‑to‑earth history shows that calculus is not about complexity; it’s about simplicity.

Infinite Powers: How Calculus Reveals the Secrets of the Universe #ad - It harnesses an unreal number—infinity—to tackle real‑world problems, breaking them down into easier ones and then reassembling the answers into solutions that feel miraculous. Infinite powers recounts how calculus tantalized and thrilled its inventors, starting with its first glimmers in ancient Greece and bringing us right up to the discovery of gravitational waves a phenomenon predicted by calculus.

By unveiling the principles of that language, Infinite Powers makes us marvel at the world anew.  .

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